2009

Washington: Seattle Hempfest 2009 - Montage

"Hemp will be the future of all mankind, or there won't be a future." Jack Herer

By Michael Bachara, Hemp News Staff
Video By Reimond Kerezsi, LK & Oregon NORML

Washington: Seattle Hempfest 2009 - Montage The featured video is an eclectic compilation of passionate speakers from the August 2009 Seattle Hempfest. It includes interesting perspectives from "The Emperor of Hemp" Jack Herer, Allen St. Pierre, Keith Stroup, Paul Stanford, George Rohrbacher, Anndrea Hermann and Seattle Hempfest's own Vivian McPeak. It is sure to give you inspiration.

"It doesn't matter if you are a Democrat or Republican, we are going to legalize marijuana no matter what happens in ten years, because when 60% of the American public wants something, they're going to get it." Allen St. Pierre

"Contact your legislators tell them to end marijuana prohibition. It's time to tax and regulate it. The more letters they get like that, the sooner the day will arrive." Paul Stanford

2009: A Year to Remember; Ten Stories on Hemp and Cannabis Reform

"There is reason to believe there is hope for the 21st Century, and that's the way it will be." Walter Cronkite

Compiled by Hemp News Staff

1. California: DEA To Yield Marijuana Jurisdiction To States - 3/2/2009

Bob Egelko, Chronicle Staff Writer

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder is sending strong signals that President Obama - who as a candidate said states should be allowed to make their own rules on medical marijuana - will end raids on pot dispensaries in California.

"What the president said during the campaign, you'll be surprised to know, will be consistent with what we'll be doing here in law enforcement," he said. "What he said during the campaign is now American policy."

Source: http://hemp.org/news/us-to-yield-marijuana-jurisdiction-to-states



2. Washington State: Kitsap Medical Marijuana Defendant Acquitted - 3/24/2009

By CHARLIE BERMANT, Port Orchard Independent Staff Writer

There is a truth that must be heard! A medical marijuana patient being prosecuted in Kitsap County Superior Court for drug trafficking was found not guilty on Tuesday morning, after a jury ruled that his use of the drug was within the law.

The jury deliberated for approximately two hours prior to its ruling.

North Dakota: Farmers Lose Appeal in 8th US Circuit to Grow Hemp

From Drug War Chronicle, Issue #614, 12/29/09

North Dakota: Farmers Lose Appeal in 8th US Circuit to Grow Hemp The 8th US Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis last Tuesday upheld a lower court's decision to dismiss a lawsuit by a pair of North Dakota hemp farmers who argued they should be able to grow hemp crops without fear of federal prosecution.

Farmers Wayne Hauge and David Monson, who is also a Republican state representative, were awarded licenses from the state department of agriculture to grow hemp three years ago. They sought approval from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and after the DEA failed to respond, they filed suit in US District Court in Bismarck. There, US District Judge Daniel Hovland dismissed their suit.

The DEA considers hemp to be marijuana. It took a successful federal court challenge to force the DEA to continue to allow for hemp food products to be imported, but American farmers are still forced to stand on the sidelines and watch as their Canadian, Chinese, and European counterparts fill their wallets with profit from hemp sales.

"I guess the next step is we'll have to take it to Congress," Hauge told the Associated Press. "The fastest and easiest way to handle this would be for the president to order the Department of Justice to stand down on all actions against industrial hemp," he added, alluding wistfully to the department's announced policy shift on medical marijuana.

United States: Washington, Other States Move to Legalize

By RACHEL LA CORTE Associated Press Writer

United States: Washington, Other States Move to Legalize OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) - Washington is one of four states where measures to legalize and regulate marijuana have been introduced, and about two dozen other states are considering bills ranging from medical marijuana to decriminalizing possession of small amounts of the herb.

"In terms of state legislatures, this is far and away the most active year that we've ever seen," said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the New York-based Drug Policy Alliance, which supports reforming marijuana laws.

Nadelmann said that while legalization efforts are not likely to get much traction in state capitals anytime soon, the fact that there is such an increase of activity "is elevating the level of public discourse on this issue and legitimizing it."

"I would say that we are close to the tipping point," he said. "At this point they are still seen as symbolic bills to get the conversation going, but at least the conversation can be a serious one."

Opponents of relaxing marijuana laws aren't happy with any conversation on the topic, other than keeping the drug illegal.

"There's no upside to it in any manner other than for those people who want to smoke pot," said Travis Kuykendall, head of the West Texas High Intensity Drug-Trafficking Area office in El Paso, Texas. "There's nothing for society in it, there's nothing good for the country in it, there's nothing for the good of the economy in it."

Washington: Lawmakers to Consider Legalizing Marijuana

By Associated Press

Washington: Lawmakers to Consider Legalizing Marijuana OLYMPIA -- Washington is one of four states where lawmakers will consider bills to legalize and regulate marijuana, and about two dozen other states are considering bills ranging from medical marijuana to decriminalizing possession of small amounts.

Meanwhile, in Oregon, marijuana-law critics have taken to the streets. A petition drive has been launched to place the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act before voters in 2010. If passed, it would direct the state to legalize marijuana, regulate its cultivation, sell it and tax the sales. Farmers could also get permits to raise marijuana or hemp.

Opponents of relaxing marijuana laws aren't happy with any conversation on the topic, other than keeping the drug illegal.

"There's no upside to it in any manner other than for those people who want to smoke pot," said Travis Kuykendall, head of the West Texas High Intensity Drug-Trafficking Area office in El Paso, Texas. "There's nothing for society in it. There's nothing good for the country in it. There's nothing for the good of the economy in it."

Legalization bills were introduced in California and Massachusetts earlier this year, and this month, New Hampshire and Washington pre-filed bills in advance of their legislative sessions that begin in January. Marijuana is illegal under federal law, but guidelines have been loosened on federal prosecution of medical marijuana under the Obama administration.

Philippines: Use of Abaca Fiber (Manila Hemp) in Car Manufacture Industry

By Fiber for Fashion, Staff

There is a truth that must be heard! From paper, cordage, furniture, and handicraft industries, uses of abaca (Musa textilis Nee) have extended to natural fiber-reinforced plastic composite material to replace some parts of cars.

Dr. Leslie Joy Lanticse-Diaz, chair, Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, University of the Philippines Diliman, shared this information with natural fiber stakeholders at the recently concluded National Conference on Natural Fibers held at Dusit Thani Hotel, Makati City. The study conducted by a team of researchers led by Dr. Diaz aimed, among other things, to incorporate the natural fiber into plastic matrices for various applications.

Research results show that the fiber of abaca or Manila hemp displayed a tensile strength of up to 970 MPa, which means that 140,686 pounds per square inch of force is needed to break this fiber. Abaca fiber was also reported to reach a maximum of 3 meters that gives it the advantage of length. She explained that these were among the factors that made abaca fiber viable for automotive composites.

The researchers also concluded that weave construction and weave patterns are significant parameters to be optimized to ensure better control and consistency in the properties of the composite to be constructed with abaca as the natural fiber reinforcement.

Oregon: 2009 Oregon NORML Rick Bayer Award - Sunil Aggarwal, Ph.D.

By Anna Diaz for Oregon NORML

Oregon: 2009 Oregon NORML Rick Bayer Award - Sunil Aggarwal, Ph.D. The American Medical Association (AMA) voted in November 2009 to reverse its long held position that marijuana be retained as a Schedule I substance with no medical value. The AMA adopted a report drafted by its Council on Science and Public Health (CSAPH) entitled, "Use of Cannabis for Medicinal Purposes," which affirmed the therapeutic benefits of marijuana and called for further research.

The change of position by the largest physician-based group in the country was precipitated in part by a resolution adopted in June 2008 by the Medical Student Section (MSS) of the AMA in support of the reclassification of marijuana's status as a Schedule 1 substance.

"It's been 72 years since the AMA has officially recognized that marijuana has both already-demonstrated and future-promising medical utility," said Sunil Aggarwal, Ph.D., the medical student who spearheaded the passage of the June 2008 resolution by the MSS and was one of the CSAPH report's designated expert reviewers. "The AMA has written an extensive, well-documented, evidence bases report that they are seeking to publish in a peer-reviewed journal that will help to educate the medical community about the scientific basis of botanical cannabis-based medicines."

Oregon: John Trudell - Children of the Plant - Oregon Medical Cannabis Awards

"I think that if the political and social movement groups and organizations that operate in this country today had the same kind of energetic commitment that the medical marijuana people have, many things could change in this country." John Trudell

By Michael Bachara, Hemp News Staff

Oregon: John Trudell - Children of the Plant In early December, Artist-Activist John Trudell spoke at the 2009 Oregon NORML Medical Cannabis Awards Dinner in Portland, Oregon. In the last few years, Trudell has spoken at several Hemp and Cannabis events around the Portland Area, and has quickly become an inspirational voice for the legalization and advancement of the Cannabis plant.

Trudell's words to the Cannabis Awards audience centered around the ideas of non-cooperation, creative intelligence, and the power of energy, clarity and coherency in today's global reality. He expressed thoughtful insight on the topics of sustainability, grass roots organization and the Cannabis plant as earth medicine.

Oregon: 2009 Oregon NORML Freedom Fighter of the Year - John Walsh

By Anna Diaz for Oregon NORML

Oregon: Oregon NORML Freedom Fighter of the Year - John Walsh John Walsh has been collecting signatures for the hemp and cannabis movement for twenty-five years, by his report. He can tell you exactly how many signatures he has collected for each and every initiative and ballot measure that relates to hemp or cannabis throughout that twenty-five year period.

Although his home is in Eugene, he travels the state, collecting signatures and registering Oregonians to vote like Johnny Appleseed planted trees. He is willing to camp out at festivals throughout the area, doing whatever it takes to gather enough signatures to further cannabis reform.

This year, he has surpassed many of his previous records by collecting the two thousand signatures needed to re-file the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act for 2010. In an amazingly short time, John worked tirelessly, pounding the pavement, traveling the state and setting up camp at Portland's Hempstalk. These signatures were turned in to the Oregon Secretary of State's office on September 21, 2009.

John, a lifetime member of Oregon NORML, advocates for all cannabis activist groups to work together. He brings that message to each and every signature gathering opportunity.

Uruguay: Cultivate Hemp; First In South America

By Steve Elliott, Toke of the Town for Hemp News

There is a truth that must be heard! Uruguay has pulled into the lead in becoming the first country in South America to authorize the cultivation of industrial hemp, Paula Alvarado reports at Treehugger.com.

The Ministry of Cattle, Agriculture and Fishing has authorized "experimental" cultivation of hemp to take place in October 2010. If results are successful, Uruguay could grant permits to farmers to start growing, according to El Pais.

The location selected for hemp cultivation is a secret. The National Institute for Farming Technology will oversee the pilot project.

The goal is to learn the hemp productive capacities of Uruguay, and to learn how different varieties of the Cannabis sativa plant respond to Uruguayan soil.

If the plan moves forward, farmers will only be able to grow hemp with special permits from the Ministry of Agriculture.

One of the companies behind the pilot project is The Latin America Hemp Trading, which aims to make Uruguay the first country in the region to enter the hemp industry.

As Alvarado reports at Treehugger, hemp is a great crop. The plant grows fast, needs few or no herbicides, and is incredible versatile. But the production of the cannabis plant is still banned in many countries because of its association with the psychoactive variety used as a drug.

Industrial hemp typically has less than 0.3 percent THC (a main psychoactive ingredient), while marijuana usually ranges from 5 to 25 percent.

Canada: Hemp Firm Hopes to Build Prairie Processing Plant

By Ed White, Winnipeg bureau

Canada:Hemp Firm Hopes to Build Prairie Processing Plant The hemp industry is trying to convince producers to give the business a chance.

Industry players told farmers attending the Canadian Hemp Trade Alliance convention in Winnipeg Nov. 17 that the industry is truly growing.

They said demand for fibre soon won’t be just a promise but something for which farmers will be able to sign contracts.

“During the next two to three growing seasons we plan upon supplementing our imports with Canadian fibre,” said Jason Finness of Naturally Advanced Technologies (NAT).

He said once NAT builds a decortication plant, it will likely pay $90 to $130 per tonne for baled hemp straw picked up at the farmgate.

Finness’ company is well-known to central Saskatchewan farmers who had hoped to supply a plant NAT said it planned to build in Craik, Sask. It would separate fibre from the hemp plant’s stalks to make fabric.

Those plans fell through, with NAT saying it had two-thirds of the money it needed to build the plant but was unable to convince the Saskatchewan government to supply the rest.

Now NAT is importing hemp fibre from Europe, processing it in the United States and selling it to major manufacturers.

Once these manufacturers begin full commercial runs of hemp fibre, NAT wants to obtain hemp fibre from Canada.

NAT hopes to build a decortication plant on the Prairies in 2010 to meet product launch hopes for 2011.

North Dakota: Farmers Lose Appeal to Grow Hemp

A federal appeals court Tuesday affirmed a lower court’s decision to dismiss a lawsuit by two North Dakota farmers who said they should be allowed to grow industrial hemp without fear of federal criminal prosecution.

By James MacPherson, Associated Press

There is a truth that must be heard! BISMARCK — A federal appeals court Tuesday affirmed a lower court’s decision to dismiss a lawsuit by two North Dakota farmers who said they should be allowed to grow industrial hemp without fear of federal criminal prosecution.

Wayne Hauge and David Monson received North Dakota’s first state licenses to grow industrial hemp nearly three years ago, but they’ve never received approval from the Drug Enforcement Administration. The farmers sued the DEA, and their case has been before the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for more than a year after U.S. District Judge Daniel Hovland dismissed it.

Hemp, which is used to make paper, lotion and other products, is related to the illegal drug marijuana. Under federal law, parts of an industrial hemp plant are considered controlled substances.

Hovland told the farmers the best remedy might be to ask Congress to change the law to explicitly distinguish hemp from marijuana.

UK: House of Hemp/Straw Brings a Sustainable Harvest

White Design’s BaleHaus explores the use of prefabricated straw panels for mass housing

By Michael Stacey, BD

UK: House of Hemp/Straw Brings a Sustainable Harvest The BaleHaus was designed by architect Craig White of White Design as part of a multi-disciplinary research project by Katharine Beadle at the University of Bath’s BRE Centre for Innovative Construction Materials.

The aim of this project is to demonstrate that straw is an appropriate form of insulation and structure for current mass housing. This probably explains why the house has been designed to meet Code for Sustainable Homes Level 4 and not Code Level 6 or “zero carbon”. Code level 4 represents a 44% reduction of energy used and CO2 emissions when compared to current building regulations.

The BaleHaus is constructed from ModCell panels which are prefabricated from locally sourced materials; the panels have a timber frame and are filled with straw. This is then covered with a lime render. The timber frame takes the vertical loads and the rendered straw infill takes in-plane or racking loads. This structural principle was tested at the University of Bath.

Exterior of the BaleHaus prototype which has been built on the campus of the University of Bath.

New Jersey: Split Verdict in Medical Marijuana Case

By Associated Press

New Jersey: Split Verdict in Medical Marijuana Case Jurors have returned a split verdict in the case of a multiple sclerosis patient in New Jersey who said he grew marijuana for medicinal purposes.

John Wilson was acquitted Thursday of the most serious charge: operating a drug production facility.

But the Somerset County jury convicted the 37-year-old of manufacturing marijuana and possession of hallucinogenic mushrooms.

During the trial, Wilson was allowed to make only brief mention of his medical condition. He testified that he grew marijuana plants behind his Franklin Township rental property and took the drug for personal use.

Washington: Vivian McPeak - Cannabis Freedom Fighter

"No political or human rights movement in America has made it this far without eventually winning, it's just a matter of time." Vivian McPeak

By Michael Bachara, Hemp News Staff

Washington: Seattle Hempfest - A Minute With Vivian McPeak It has been said that Vivian Mcpeak, Seattle Hempfest Event Director, is quite possibly the most inspirational speaker in the hemp movement, and this writer agrees with that consensus.

Vivian has the ability to energize a crowd like no other and has become a pillar of strength for those who demand their voices be heard regarding cannabis reform. There have been many fantastic and inspiring speakers throughout the years at the Seattle Hempfest from the iconic Jack Herer to the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) founder Keith Stroup, but once you have heard Vivian speak, something about you is different; you feel you have become a part of history.

Wisconsin: Sides Square Off Over Medical Marijuana

By SCOTT BAUER, Associated Press

There is a truth that must be heard! MADISON, Wis. A Republican opponent to allowing medical marijuana in Wisconsin accused Democratic backers Tuesday of using chronically ill patients to push a secret agenda of making pot legal for everyone.

Rep. Leah Vukmir's claim at a public hearing drew boos and other derisive comments from many in the room packed with sick people in wheelchairs or walking with the assistance of canes. Supporters say marijuana helps patients deal with diseases, cancer treatments and other ailments by relieving them of pain and nausea.

Vukmir said there was no medical reasons to use marijuana and that other pain relief measures should be pursued that "do not require individuals to light a joint." She said once marijuana is legalized for medical uses, momentum will grow to make it available to everyone, as has happened elsewhere.

Wisconsin: Public Hearing On Medical Marijuana Bill

By Steve Elliott, Toke of the Town for Hemp News

There is a truth that must be heard! The Wisconsin Legislature will hold a public hearing Tuesday to debate SB 368, the Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act, which would allow seriously ill patients to use cannabis without fear of arrest if their doctor recommends it.

The hearing will be at 10 a.m., Tuesday, Dec. 15, at the State Capitol, Room 412 East, Madison, Wis.

Qualifying patients with doctors' notes could grow their own marijuana or obtain it from "compassion centers" around the state if the bill becomes law.

Wisconsin is working to become the 14th state to allow medical marijuana. Legislation is in the works in at least 14 other states, according to Mike Meno, assistant director of communications at the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP).

The bill is the namesake of Jacki Rickert, a 58-year-old grandmother from Mondovi who has Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and advanced reflex sympathetic dystrophy, and who founded medical marijuana advocacy organization Is My Medicine Legal Yet? (IMMLY) in 1992.

Rickert led hundreds of medical marijuana supporters in an October rally at the Wisconsin State Capitol in support of the legislation bearing her name.

The House Public Health Committee and Senate Committee on Health, Health Insurance, Privacy, Property Tax Relief, and Revenue will host the hearing on the bill, which is sponsored by state Rep. Mark Pocan and state Sen. Jon Erpenbach.

Oregon: Medical Cannabis Awards 2009

December 12, 2009

10am to 5pm: OMCA Holiday Bazaar and Cannabis Community College

6pm to 10pm: Awards Banquet & An Evening with John Trudell


View Larger Map

Place: Portland Event Center
300 NE Multnomah St.
Portland, OR 97232

* Celebrate your cannabis lifestyle with the only Green Bazaar in the area, perfect for all your holiday shopping needs.

* Top glass artists from around the state featuring one of a kind medical delivery devices.

Oregon: Reefer Madness and More - Medical Marijuana Q & A (VIDEO)

Salem-News.com addresses several points regarding the use of legal medical marijuana in Oregon, California and other locations.

Video and photo by Tim King Salem-News.com

Oregon: Reefer Madness and More - Medical Marijuana Q & A (VIDEO)(SALEM, Ore.) - In this segment of our ongoing series on Medical Marijuana, Dr. Phil Leveque and Bonnie King discuss subject from several different angles.

From the "Reefer Madness" of days gone by, to the current medicinal enlightenment period, there is an unending supply of unanswered questions sent in by our viewers.

Dr. Leveque speaks with Bonnie about a growing amount of coverage on the connections between autism and the use of medical marijuana, a subject that has recently been seriously covered by both ABC and CBS News.

The matter moved to the forefront in recent weeks, with a mother's declaration that medical marijuana was allowing her autistic son some of the calmest and most productive days in his life, all she says, because of this natural herb.

Dr. Phil Leveque is one of the most significant authorities on medical marijuana alive in the world today. His points have stood the test of time and now are finding rapid acceptance from a broader section of the American public than ever before.

Internet communications have allowed a voice of truth to emerge that some possibly never anticipated.

WATCH THE VIDEO REPORT BELOW:

Dr. Phil Leveque & Bonnie King discuss medical marijuana. Salem-News.com Part 1 of 2

Washington D.C.: Medical Marijuana on the Way

Funding bill would allow D.C. to implement decade-old law

By CHRIS NEEDHAM, NBC Washington D.C.

Washington D.C.: Medical Marijuana on the Way in D.C. Medical marijuana could be legalized in D.C. if a giant government funding bill passes Congress. House and Senate conferees have come up with a compromise conference agreement that would provide funding for most federal departments and agencies. But unlike past years, there is no provision that would prevent D.C. from legalizing medical marijuana.

In 1998, D.C. voters approved a referendum that would allow the possession of and usage of medical marijuana. Republicans in Congress swiftly blocked the referendum by placing a provision in funding bills that prevents D.C. from enforcing or implementing the law. That provision has appeared each year until this year's funding bill.

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