Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp

Oregon: Two Marijuana Legalization Initiative Petition Drives Start Strong

HEMPinOregon

By Steve Elliott and Michael Bachara
Hemp News

The national wave of marijuana law reform is gaining momentum every day, and it isn't going to leave out Oregon. More than 30,000 people came to Kelley Point Park on September 7 and 8 for the ninth annual Hempstalk Festival, and more than 5,000 of them signed two marijuana initiative petitions while they were there.

Initiative 21 would amend the Oregon Constitution, ending criminal penalties for cannabis and permitting adult recreational marijuana use, possession and cultivation.

Initiative 22, the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act 2014, creates a commission to regulate the cultivation, processing, and sale of marijuana, generating hundreds of millions of dollars for the Oregon General Fund, helping to pay for schools, roads, and social services.

The groups HEMP in Oregon (Help End Marijuana Prohibition in Oregon) and CRRH (Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp) have kicked off a vigorous volunteer and paid petition drive to get both initiatives on the ballot for November 2014, according to director Paul Stanford.

"Marijuana prohibition does not work and is expensive to maintain," Stanford said. "We must move forward on a better path for hemp and marijuana in Oregon."

Oregon: Two Marijuana Initiatives Filed For State Ballot

PaulStanfordTHCF

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Hemp News and The Hemp and Cannabis Foundation (THCF) owner Paul Stanford has filed two new initiatives to legalize marijuana in Oregon.

One of the measures is similar to an 2012 initiative that fell short by just six points at the polls, but with a couple of major changes, reports Jeff Mapes at The Oregonian. The commission would no longer be chosen by cannabis growers, retailers and others in the marijuana community, but instead would be appointed by the governor, according to Stanford.

"In retrospect, [the commission proposal] was probably the most damaging thing in the campaign," Stanford said of Measure 80. The Portland-based president of the Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH) said that a governor-appointed commission, in the new proposal, would poll better with voters.

The other major change from Measure 80, which would have allowed adults to possess unlimited quantities of marijuana, is that the new proposal would impose limits of 24 plants and 24 ounces of dried marijuana.

Stanford's second proposed initiative would constitutionally allow those 21 and older to possess and grow cannabis. It would allow the state to "reasonably define, limit and regulate" marijuana.

Stanford said he is working with a broad coalition of cannabis activists and will go ahead with whichever of the two legalization measures they decide has the best chance of passage.

Oregon: Best Legislative Session Ever For Marijuana Policy Reform?

(Illustration: Where's Weed?)By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Marijuana policy reform is advancing on multiple fronts in Oregon, with both medicinal cannabis and general legalization measures gaining traction in an increasingly friendly Legislature.

"We are seeing the best legislative session for drug policy reform -- certainly since the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act passed in 1998, and perhaps ever -- this go-round," Paul Stanford, president of The Hemp and Cannabis Foundation (THCF) and the Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH), which owns Hemp News.

In the last week, the Oregon Senate:

• Passed SB 281 on a 19-11 vote. This bill adds post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to the list of debilitating medical conditions which qualify patients for the protections of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act (OMMA).

• Passed SB 40, 24-6. This bill realigns the felony level designations of Manufacturing and Possession to be consistent with the rescheduling in Oregon of marijuana from Schedule I to Schedule II; and creates misdemeanor marijuana possession (more than one ounce, less than four ounces) and misdemeanor hashish possession (less than 1/4 ounce).

Up Close: John Sinclair - Free the Weed

By Michael Bachara, Hemp News Correspondent

There is a truth that must be heard! Every once in a while an activist comes along that changes the way a political issue is perceived. Last month, Paul Stanford of the Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH) had the opportunity to interview such a man, John Sinclair. In Stanford’s interview (above), Sinclair discusses the current medical cannabis community and gives his views on where he hopes the cannabis legalization movement will evolve.

Sinclair, an iconic American poet from Flint, Michigan, is the former leader of the White Panther Party, which was an anti-racist counter cultural group of white socialists seeking to help the Black Panthers in the Civil Rights movement from November 1968 to July 1969.

Sinclair has also been steering the marijuana counter culture towards legalization since 1965. He was introduced to marijuana activism after receiving, from New York City, a marijuana flier from Allen Ginsburg and Ed Sanders’ pro marijuana group LeMar (Organization to Legalize Marijuana). Being familiar with a print press, Sinclair created his own marijuana flier and began holding monthly meetings to end marijuana prohibition in the state of Michigan.

About Hemp News

Hemp News, a compilation of international news stories about hemp and cannabis, is a public service of Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH). This is intended for political and educational use on the subject of cannabis and the wide-ranging effects of drug prohibition.

The Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH) goal is to educate people about the medicinal and industrial uses for cannabis in our global society in order to restore hemp cultivation and end adult cannabis prohibition.

This site is intended to be an avenue for the community to empower themselves with information about this diverse and wonderful plant called HEMP. There is a truth that must be heard!

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