Hemp History Week

Kentucky: Hemp Grown In Commonwealth Used As Insulation In Lexington Housing Project

Kentucky Hemp Insulation

Kentucky's first hemp crop was grown in 1775, and Kentucky went on to become the nation's leading hemp-producing state in the mid-19th century with peak production of 40,000 tons in 1850

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

This weekend, to commemorate Hemp History Week, a two day "Building with Hemp" workshop brought community members together in Lexington, Kentucky to begin insulating a house with Kentucky-grown hemp. Kris Nonn, a construction director at North Limestone Community Development Corporation who organized the workshop, believes it is important to understand “how something that grows really well here can be used for construction.”

Kentucky: Industrial Hemp Processing Plant Expands In Louisville

Sunstrand

The processing plant fibers are being developed to create furnace filters and filaments for 3D printing

By Michael Bachara
Hemp News

Sunstrand, a Louisville-based hemp processing plant, is a biomaterials company that processes hemp, kanaf, flax, and bamboo for industrial and technical applications. In 2014, the business started in Okolona, after Kentucky allowed industrial hemp. The company's new 25,000-square-foot plant is more than four times larger than its original location. The company has contracts with several Kentucky farmers to grow hemp, and their fibers are being developed to create furnace filters and filaments for 3D printing.

U.S.: 7th Annual Hemp History Week Features Events June 6-12

HempHistoryWeek2016.jpg

The 7th annual Hemp History Week will be observed June 6-12, 2016, marked by several special events during the campaign. Hemp History Week is the national effort of grassroots organizers, leading hemp product manufacturers, farmers and advocates from all walks of life, working to change federal policy on industrial hemp in the United States.

This year promises to be an historic time in the movement to legalize hemp farming, as more farmers than ever before are planting hemp in states that have lifted prohibition on the crop. The 7th annual campaign will include grassroots events across the country, nationwide retail events and promotions, hemp plantings (in some states where hemp farming is legal under Section 7606 of the U.S. Farm Bill), documentary screenings, farmer outreach, and more.

In addition to its sponsorship of the national program, CV Sciences, via their PlusCBD Oil™ brand, will also be hosting and participating in a number of events focused in California and Kentucky.

U.S.: Hemp History Week Launches Nationwide With Plantings, Courses, and Events

HempHistoryWeek2015

The 6th annual Hemp History Week campaign began on Monday, bringing more than 1,400 events including documentary film screenings, cooking demonstrations, retail promotions, educational outreach, spring hemp plantings and hemp home building courses to the public—all aimed to catalyze movement on the issue of lifting the federal ban on industrial hemp farming in the United States.

Organized by Hemp Industries Association (HIA) and Vote Hemp, Hemp History Week will be held June 1-7, with events occurring in all 50 states. Encouraged by federal support in Congress, with the Industrial Hemp Farming Act introduced in both the House and Senate in January 2015, the campaign's theme Sow the Seed highlights spring plantings in states that have passed legislation legalizing industrial hemp farming, and encourages consumers to participate in the call for support among legislators to support industrial hemp farming and the growth of the hemp industry nationwide.

To learn more about Hemp History Week, visit: www.HempHistoryWeek.com.

Spring Hemp Plantings

HIA and Vote Hemp have partnered with University of Kentucky's College of Agriculture, to coordinate a hemp planting demonstration, to occur June 2, on the site of the university's hemp pilot program fields. Throughout the country, farmers in states that have legalized the cultivation of industrial hemp will begin to plant this spring, and Hemp History Week is coordinating events to celebrate the return of hemp to the American agrarian landscape.

U.S.: Sixth Annual Hemp History Week Set For June 1-7, 2015

HempHistoryWeek2015

The Hemp Industries Association (HIA) and Vote Hemp have announced that the sixth annual Hemp History Week will be held June 1-7, 2015. Surging with momentum following a monumental year in 2014, wherein hemp was both legally cultivated and harvested in Kentucky, Colorado and Vermont, this year's campaign will focus on the increased acreage of hemp on U.S. farms with the theme Sow the Seed.

Throughout all 50 states, more than 1,100 grassroots events will bring documentary film screenings, cooking demonstrations, retail promotions, educational outreach, spring plantings and hemp home building courses to the public, catalyzing movement on the issue of hemp legalization nationwide.

To learn more about Hemp History Week, visit: www.HempHistoryWeek.com.

Spring Hemp Plantings

HIA and Vote Hemp will work with farmers in states that have legalized the cultivation of hemp, to coordinate events this spring to celebrate the planting of hemp crops. The events will be open to both community and media attendance.

An environmentally sustainable crop, hemp helps restore nutrients to soil via phytoremediation, and does not require chemical inputs of pesticides and herbicides to flourish. As farmers open their hemp fields to the public, grassroots activists will offer educational events about industrial hemp—its history, agronomy, health and ecological benefits—as we join together to sow the seed.

The Health Benefits of Hemp

The History of Hemp News

D Paul Stanford CCS

This publication, Hemp News, is the oldest online news service. In 1991, Paul Stanford began posting Hemp News on the Internet, back prior to the creation of the web. The worldwide web wasn't created until 1994. Stanford began posting news stories about marijuana on Usenet newsgroups, or bulletin boards that are text only computer sites with names like alt.hemp, misc.activism.cannabis, alt.politics.marijuana, alt.drugs.pot. Usenet newsgroups still exist and are archived in perpetuity.

Starting in 1988, Stanford subscribed his Commodore 64 computer to Compuserve, the first national Internet Service Provider, at speeds of 1200 baud over the telephone landline, or about 50 alphabet/numeric characters per second. Stanford first subscribed to Compuserve's Executive News Service, which searched the printed news media's information, like the Associated Press and New York Times, and dropped news stories that matched selected keywords into an online folder, which cost $16 an hour to access. After reading the latest international news stories about marijuana, Stanford realized that most people, even those who were interested in marijuana and ending its prohibition, didn't have access to this news. When Stanford began posting these stories to Usenet newsgroups, no other online compilation of news had been posted about anything to the Internet.

Oregon: Hemp Medium Density Fiberboard - Hemp Equals Jobs

Oregon Hemp History, Connecting the Past to the Future

By Michael Bachara, Hemp News Correspondent

Oregon: Hemp Medium Density Fiberboard - Hemp Equals Jobs In the early 1990's, C & S Specialty Builder's Supply (namely Bill Conde, Dave Seber, Barry Davis, and Tim Pate) in Harrisburg, Oregon, imported regulated bales of hemp and began working on a medium density fiberboard (MDF). The evolution of hemp MDF as a viable building supply option began when Bill Conde of C & S took their hemp fiber research and ideas to Paul Maulberg, the head of Washington State University's Wood Engineering Laboratory.

Conde explains in a 2005 Mycotopia blog, "We asked if [Maulberg] would consider trying some hemp fiber to make some experimental hemp MDF, and his reply was, 'You bet, hemp is the King Cong of fiber. I would love a chance to work with some."

Excitedly, Conde and team began the process working with Maulberg on creation and testing of the hemp MDF. It was soon discovered how strong the hemp fiber truly was, as the full-length hemp fibers jammed both of the processing machines and brought things to a standstill. The process for breaking down the fibers was redesigned and restarted with ultimate success.

United States: Hemp fans look toward Lyster Dewey's past, and the Pentagon, for higher ground

By Manuel Roig-Franzia, Washington Post Staff Writer

United States: Hemp fans look toward Lyster Dewey's past, and the Pentagon, for higher ground Hemp needed a hero. Needed one bad.

The gangly plant -- once a favorite of military ropemakers -- couldn't catch a break. Even as legalized medical marijuana has become more and more commonplace, the industrial hemp plant -- with its minuscule levels of the chemical that gives marijuana its kick -- has remained illegal to cultivate in the United States.

Enter the lost hemp diaries.

Found recently at a garage sale outside Buffalo but never publicly released, these journals chronicle the life of Lyster H. Dewey, a botanist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture whose long career straddled the 19th and 20th centuries. Dewey writes painstakingly about growing exotically named varieties of hemp -- Keijo, Chinamington and others -- on a tract of government land known as Arlington Farms. In effect, he was tending Uncle Sam's hemp farm.

What's gotten hemp advocates excited about the discovery is the location of that farm. A large chunk of acreage was handed over to the War Department in the 1940s for construction of the world's largest office building: the Pentagon. So now, hempsters can claim that an important piece of their legacy lies in the rich Northern Virginia soil alongside a hugely significant symbol of the government that has so enraged and befuddled them over the years.

All thanks to Lyster Dewey.

History: Hemp History Week 2010 - Jack Herer Discovers Hemp for Victory

Things about hemp that were not taught to Jack in school, he tried to teach others. He was a steward of the plant and devoted his life to the support of cannabis as he believed it was the greatest gift the world has ever known.

By Michael Bachara, Hemp News Staff

United States: Hemp History Week 2010 - Jack Herer Discovers Hemp for Victory Hemp for Victory was a 1942 documentary produced by the U.S. Department of Agriculture to encourage farmers to grow outlawed industrial hemp for the war effort as a way to stabilize America during World War II.

As the War on Drugs proceeded onward, the United States Department of Agriculture Library and the Library of Congress stated no such movie was made by the USDA or any branch of the U.S. government. His creditability threatened, Jack Herer made it his mission to uncover the truth about Hemp for Victory. He knew it was a USDA creation and not simply folklore.

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