initiative 21

Oregon: Why 24 Ounces? CRRH Explains Possession and Cultivation Limits Proposed in 2014 Initiative

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Initiative 22, also known as the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act, would legalize marijuana and set the limits of personal possession and cultivation at 24 ounces or 24 plants. The Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp, sponsor of Initiatives 21 and 22, this week addressed the reason for setting these limits.

"Twenty-four ounces is not an arbitrary number," said Jersey Deutsch, campaign director for CRRH. "If anything, the limits in place under Colorado and Washington law are unnecessarily low, and possibly detrimental for medical users who make their own medicine at home."

Michael Steinlage, development director for the campaign, added: "It is true that under OCTA the allowable limits of both possession and cultivation would be 24 ounces, but this amount is already the legal limit for OMMP cardholders. For many patients on limited budgets whose preferred method of ingestion isn't smoking, the creation of homemade extracts and edibles would greatly ease the cost of self-medication.

"It takes large amounts of the flowering plant to make relatively small supplies of edible goods or oils, and these items can be very expensive when purchased from dispensaries," Steinlage said.

For those who choose to grow their own at home, a yearly harvest of 24 ounces would provide 2 ounces per month of the cured flowering plant.

Oregon: Grassroots Cannabis Campaign Gathering Signatures

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Two cannabis legalization measures in Oregon are gathering signatures around the state. Initiative Petitions 21 and 22, the Oregon Cannabis Amendment and The Oregon Cannabis Tax Act, are in the race for the July 3 signature deadline. Initiative 21 would end criminal penalties for cannabis, while Initiative 22 regulates and taxes cannabis, including hemp for industrial and agricultural uses.

"The people of Oregon stand with Initiatives 21 and 22 and they demonstrate this by getting involved," said campaign director Jersey Deutsch of the Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH). "This is because our legislation puts an end to cannabis prohibition, ensuring no one in Oregon will be criminalized for cannabis again."

Currently CRRH has more than 20 staff members, 3,000 volunteers, and 6,000 independent Oregon donors, making them second only to Oregon United for Marriage with the largest volunteer campaign in the state.

"Volunteers join our campaign because they believe we must put an end to prohibition and criminalization, while ensuring citizens of all ages are free of cannabis related felonies," Deutsch said. "CRRH will continue the fight to end cannabis prohibition by mobilizing Oregon supporters, educating community members, fighting for patients, training and empowering volunteers, growing the campaign, and pushing legislation forward."

Sign the Petitions: I-21 and I-22: http://cannabistaxact.org/sign-petition/

Oregon: Legislature Fails On Marijuana Legalization; Initiative Campaigns Promise A Solution

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Activists Promise 'Big Announcement' Next Week

Paul Stanford: "These measures are going to be on the ballot"

In light of recent news that the Oregon Legislature has abandoned meaningful reforms, initiative activists are moving forward with a new phase in their campaign to end criminal penalties for marijuana.

"We salute the efforts of Representative Peter Buckley and other progressive-minded legislators," said chief petitioner Paul Stanford, "and we are ready to pick up where they fell and bring a pair of ballot initiatives restoring the progressive pioneer spirit that Oregon is well known for."

Oregon has lagged behind other Western states in bringing reform to marijuana law. Two initiative petitions, IP 21 and IP 22, would change that. "Prohibition doesn't work," Stanford said. "Filling our jails with nonviolent marijuana prisoners is a waste of public resources and people's future. We will end prohibition and end criminal penalties for marijuana."

Oregon's 2014 Initiative 21, a constitutional amendment to end prohibition and stop imposing criminal penalties for marijuana, has 38,000 signatures collected to date. It needs 116,284 valid registered Oregon voters' signatures by July 3rd to qualify for the November 2014 ballot.

Initiative 22, a proposed statute to regulate and tax marijuana, and allow farmers to grow hemp for fuel, fiber and food, has gathered 25,000 signatures. It needs 87,213 valid registered Oregon voters' signatures to qualify for the November ballot.

Oregon: Activists Look To End Marijuana Prohibition In 2014

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A bill that would ask Oregon voters if they want to legalize marijuana while leaving the regulations up to the Legislature passed its first committee last Thursday.

Senate Bill 1556 passed the Senate Judiciary Committee on a 3-2 vote, with all Democrats supporting it and all Republicans opposing, reports Jeff Mapes at The Oregonian. The bill now goes to the Senate Rules Committee.

The measure was amended before passing to lower the amount of cannabis that adults 21 and older would be allowed to possess in private. The amount was lowered from eight ounces and four plants in the original bill to six ounces and three plants in the amended version.

Cannabis activists are already gathering signatures for two legalization initiatives.

Initiative 21 would amend the Oregon Constitution, ending criminal penalties for cannabis and permitting adult recreational marijuana use, possession and cultivation.

Initiative 22, the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act 2014, creates a commission to regulate the cultivation, processing, and sale of marijuana, generating hundreds of millions of dollars for the Oregon General Fund, helping to pay for schools, roads, and social services.

The groups HEMP in Oregon (Help End Marijuana Prohibition in Oregon) and CRRH (Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp) have kicked off a vigorous volunteer and paid petition drive to get both initiatives on the ballot for November 2014, according to director Paul Stanford.

Oregon: Two Marijuana Initiatives Hold Signature Turn-In

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Cannabis advocates on Friday morning turned in tens of thousands signatures for two marijuana initiatives in the state capitol of Salem. The initiatives are aiming for the November 2014 ballot in Oregon.

Oregon's 2014 Initiative 21 is a constitutional amendment to end marijuana prohibition, and Initiative 22 is a statute to regulate and tax marijuana, allowing farmers to grow hemp for fuel, fiber and food. Organizers behind I-21 and I-22 turned in the signatures to the Oregon Secretary of State's Elections Division offices on the 5th floor in the Public Service Building.

“Prohibition doesn't work," said chief petitioner Paul Stanford of the Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH). "Filling our jails with nonviolent marijuana prisoners is a waste. It is time to end marijuana prohibition.”

Recent polls show that more than 60 percent of likely Oregon voters support ending marijuana prohibition now. "Our initiatives, one constitutional, the other statutory, will poise Oregon to lead this new industry, which some say is the fastest growth industry in America today," Stanford said.

Who: Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp, an Oregon nonprofit PAC

What: Press Conference and Signature Turn-In for Two Marijuana Initiatives

When: 10 a.m. on Friday, December 6

Where: Lobby of the Public Service Building at 255 Capitol St. NE; Salem, Oregon

With this submission, I-21 and I-22 move into the lead and

Oregon: Two Marijuana Legalization Initiative Petition Drives Start Strong

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By Steve Elliott and Michael Bachara
Hemp News

The national wave of marijuana law reform is gaining momentum every day, and it isn't going to leave out Oregon. More than 30,000 people came to Kelley Point Park on September 7 and 8 for the ninth annual Hempstalk Festival, and more than 5,000 of them signed two marijuana initiative petitions while they were there.

Initiative 21 would amend the Oregon Constitution, ending criminal penalties for cannabis and permitting adult recreational marijuana use, possession and cultivation.

Initiative 22, the Oregon Cannabis Tax Act 2014, creates a commission to regulate the cultivation, processing, and sale of marijuana, generating hundreds of millions of dollars for the Oregon General Fund, helping to pay for schools, roads, and social services.

The groups HEMP in Oregon (Help End Marijuana Prohibition in Oregon) and CRRH (Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp) have kicked off a vigorous volunteer and paid petition drive to get both initiatives on the ballot for November 2014, according to director Paul Stanford.

"Marijuana prohibition does not work and is expensive to maintain," Stanford said. "We must move forward on a better path for hemp and marijuana in Oregon."

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