Telegraph

Australia: 'Stoner Sloth' Anti-Marijuana Campaign Backfires, Draws Widespread Ridicule

StonerSloth

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

An anti-marijuana ad campaign in Australia featuring a Stoner Sloth has drawn widespread criticism and online ridicule; the campaign is being derided as a laughable failure.

The Stoner Sloth campaign, paid for by the New South Wales government with taxpayer money, was supposed to convince teens not to smoke marijuana, reports the BBC. The Stoner Sloth character is portrayed as being unable to cope with various social situations after getting fucked up.

The three original videos show Stoner Sloth acting dopey and reacting slowly to the people around, who are apparently disgusted by Stoner Sloth's dull-wittedness. "You're Worse On Weed," we are told by the ads.

Even anti-marijuana groups in Australia attacked the lameness of the campaign. “While we wish the NSW Government luck in future cannabis campaigns, the current Stoner Sloth campaign doesn't reflect NCPIC views on how cannabis harms campaigns should be approached,” sniffed the National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre, reports Mark Molloy at The Telegraph.

The NCPIC's logo was used to endorse the campaign, but it was quick to distance itself, claiming it had "no input" into the final ad.

The top trending Twitter hashtag in Australia on Saturday was #stonersloth, and it was still trending as of Monday.

Unsurprisingly, Keith Richards Still Likes A Morning Joint

KeithRichards[HighTimes]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Keith Richards likes to wake and bake. "Wait... I need a NEWS STORY for this?" You may be thinking. But the guy's 71 now, and he quit cocaine a decade ago.

"I smoke regularly, an early morning joint," Richards told Mojo Magazine. "Strictly Californian."

Richards, who lives in a home in Sussex, England, which he bought in the 1960s and has a Manhattan apartment, praised the legalization of cannabis in some American states, reports The Telegraph.

"One of the most pleasant things to watch is a map of American [showing states where pot is legal], where it goes, green... green... green," Richards said. "Whether it's a good thing in the long run, I don't know."

Richards gave up cocaine back in 2006 after falling out of a tree and undergoing brain surgery. He said he hasn't taken heroin since 1978. He still drinks, he told Mojo, but "other than that, I'm pretty straight."

According to Richards, the Stones may return to the studio at the end of this year.

Photo: High Times

U.K.: Green Property: Refurbishing derelict homes

Sarah Lonsdale tests the latest 'eco’ products and sorts the fads from the finds. This week: refurbishing derelict homes

By Sarah Lonsdale, The Telegraph

There is a truth that must be heard! It is a contemporary scandal of monstrous proportions. There are about two million families in this country who need homes but who are priced out of buying or renting because of a lack of supply. Yet there are thousands upon thousands of houses lying empty – nearly three quarters of a million in England alone.

In the Midlands, North East and North West, great swathes of perfectly sound Victorian terraces, in better condition than ones in Fulham or Putney that change hands for over £1m each, are standing derelict; boarded up, their roofs stripped of lead, the elements slowly doing their destructive work.

In the past few years, 16,000 period terraces have been bulldozed to the ground and only 3,000 new homes have been rebuilt to replace them. Thousands more stand empty: design classics with airy front rooms flooded with light from their bay windows and ingenious split-level floor planning going to dry rot and black mould.

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