Texas

Texas: Southwest Cannabis Conference Announces Keynote Speaker Montel Williams

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The Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo on Monday announced special celebrity keynote speaker Montel Williams for what organizers are calling "the largest Texas cannabis conference in history."

Williams will speak Sunday, February 28 from 5:15 to 6:30 pm at the Fort Worth Convention Center, 1201 Houston St, in Fort Worth.

Montel has been traveling the country as possibly the highest profile advocate for sensible medical cannabis policy since his diagnosis with multiple sclerosis (MS) in 1999. He has been a critical voice for marijuana policy reform, having stated that “medical marijuana has allowed me to live a productive, fruitful life despite having multiple sclerosis. Many thousands of others all over this country – less well-known than I but whose stories are just as real – have experienced the same thing.”

Texas is on the verge of implementing CBD laws, which represents the first step toward medical marijuana legalization. Texas has the second largest population in the country, and all eyes are on Texas to make history and move toward responsible legalization of medical marijuana in a show of compassion for the untold number of Texans who suffer from serious illness.

“Texas has the potential to become one of the largest markets for medical marijuana in the country,” said Rory Mendoza, founder of Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo. “Having a very high profile advocate such as Montel Williams come to this historic event to share his story about how medical marijuana has changed his life, is a positive step in creating momentum towards necessary change.

Texas: Marijuana Show To Hold Auditions At Southwest Cannabis Conference

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The Marijuana Show, a reality cable TV show called the “Shark Tank for Ganjapreneurs” by CNBC, will be making a free presentation combined with auditions at the first-ever Texas marijuana conference, The Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo in Fort Worth, Texas.

At the Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo, cannabis entrepreneurs will be able to participate in the “Pitchfest” and make a three minute presentation to Karen Paull and Wendy Robbins, The Marijuana Show’s producers. Pitchfest winners may star in season three of the show in which over $15 million has been offered to previous contestants. All Expo attendees are invited to participate and watch the Pitchfest at no charge.

The “Pitchfest“ auditions for the The Marijuana Show will be held at the Ft. Worth Convention Center, Saturday, February 27, from noon to 1:00 pm (CST). To register and find out more details about the Pitchfest, visit this site.

People interested in the Pitchfest should be able to present business plans and proof of applicable licenses and permits. They must be over age 21 and present a valid ID.

At this same Pitchfest, the producers will also make a presentation, “7 Secrets to a Successful Pitch," to all interested Expo attendees on February 27.

In addition, a free webinar on “7 Secrets of a Successful Pitch” will be held on February 23 at 6pm Mountain Time. To register, go to www.greenequitymedia.com.

Texas: Marijuana Investment Panel To Address Billion Dollar Industry At Conference

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Investment in the billion-dollar marijuana industry will be the subject of the first-ever cannabis convention taking place in Texas.

Featured financial experts scheduled to appear include Patrick Moran, CEO of AcquiFlow and founder of the first legal cannabis company in the state; Michael Blunk of the ArcView Group; Alan Brochstein founder of 420 Investor; and Brett Roper of Medicine Man Technologies.

“My co-panelists and I will share with Investors how to effectively engage in this emerging Texas industry,” said Moran, cofounder and president of the Texas Cannabis Industry Association (TCIA). “At the Southwest Cannabis Expo, we will also inform entrepreneurs on pitfalls to avoid and actions to take that will help them successfully raise capital.”

According to Blunk, director of entrepreneur relations for ArcView, sales in the cannabis industry are expected to hit $6.7 billion in 2016 after a 17 percent increase to $5.4 billion in 2015. “Investors are eager to learn more about the unique opportunity to be a part of this emerging industry at this historic time and place in history,” he said.

The groundbreaking two-day Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo in Texas will take place from 9 a.m –6 p.m., Saturday and Sunday, February 27 and 28, 2016, at the Ft. Worth Convention Center, 1201 Houston St., in Fort Worth. Admission is $50 per day. Information and tickets are available at swccexpo.com, or by calling 1-888-729-8199.

Texas: Event Taps Into Billion-Dollar Cannabis Industry

TexasMarijuana[PrisonPlanet]

The Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo Texas has announced its preliminary line-up of high-profile speakers including representatives from Texas A&M Law School, Weed for Warriors, Texas NORML, ArcView Group, Women Grow, and former National Football League players from the Gridiron Cannabis Coalition.

The two-day conference will take place from 9 a.m. – 6 .m., Saturday and Sunday, February 27 and 28, at the Ft. Worth Convention Center, 1201 Houston St., in Fort Worth. The marijuana and hemp focused professional event is first of its kind in Texas.

The gathering is open to the public and geared towards business and medical professionals who want to gain insight into the national billion-dollar marijuana industry. Admission is $50 per day. Information and tickets are available at swccexpo.com, or by calling 1-888-729-8199.

The groundbreaking event will feature exhibits, nationally known speakers, and panel discussions regarding investment outlooks, global medical perspectives, professional sports and cannabis, legal access for U.S. military veterans, local and federal legislative updates, women of cannabis and more.

“Cannabis education is the primary purpose of this important event, where industry meets consumer, and consumer meets industry,” said Rory Mendoza, executive director of the conference.

Panel highlights include:

Texas: Customs Seizes Fake Carrots Stuffed With More Than A Ton Of Marijuana

CarrotsAreReallyMarijuana[USCustomsandBorderProtection]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents on January 10 discovered more than a ton of marijuana disguised as carrots on the border between Mexico and the United States near McAllen, Texas.

Agents first performed a search of the vehicle carrying what appeared to be a commercial shipment of carrots by using "non-intrusive" imaging technology, reports Alex Lockie at Business Insider, then took a second pass with drug-detecting dogs.

Bundles of marijuana were wrapped in orange tape, disguised as large carrots, in the shipment, which was crossing the Pharr-Reynosa International Bridge. There were 2,817 carrot-shaped packages of marijuana, which agents claimed were worth $499,000 on the street, reports FoxNews.com.

"Once again, drug smuggling organizations have demonstrated their creativity in attempting to smuggle large quantities of narcotics across the US/Mexico border," said Port Director Efrain Solis Jr., of the Hidalgo/Pharr/Anzalduas Port of Entry.

"Our officers are always ready to meet those challenges and remain vigilant towards any type of illicit activities," Solid said.

Homeland Security agents will follow up on the carrot investigation, authorities said.

Texas: Professional Marijuana Conference To Draw Thousands To Ft. Worth

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Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo Texas
February 26 – 28, 2016 at the Fort Worth Convention Center

Texas will enter the national spotlight in marijuana law reform as thousands of cannabis professionals from across the nation prepare to converge at the Southwest Cannabis Conference & Expo Texas, Friday, February 26 – Sunday, February 28, at the Fort Worth Convention Center, 1201 Houston St., in Fort Worth.

Presented by the Southwest Expo Group, the Dallas Observer, and Texas Cannabis Industry Association, the historic cannabis event will be held from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. daily, and is expected to draw attendees from across the country and throughout the state. Information and tickets are available at swccexpo.com, or by calling 1-888-729-8199 or 1-602-451-2647.

“The support of the Texas Cannabis Industry Association (TCIA), and Women Grow Texas, NORML Texas, and MPP Texas as local presenting sponsors will help make the convention possible,” said Rory Mendoza, expo chief executive 0fficer.

The first-ever Texas cannabis conference will highlight medical cannabis and the new Texas CDB laws, cannabis in athletics, business-to-business networking, industry expert guest speakers, interactive workshops, education on Texas MJ procedures and policies, and more than 150 floor exhibitors.

Weed for Warriors project for Veterans' affairs and the Gridiron Cannabis Coalition are expected to have a large presence at the event.

Texas: Local Marijuana Reform Advocates To Gather In Amarillo, Lubbock For Training

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Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy is mobilizing activists throughout Texas in an effort to inject marijuana policy debate into 2016 state legislative races

Local marijuana policy reform advocates will gather Saturday (in Amarillo) and Sunday (in Lubbock) for advocacy training events.

The Amarillo event, on Saturday, January 9, will be held at 12:30 p.m., at the Amarillo Southwest Library, 6801 SW 44th Ave. Details of the event are available at http://texasmarijuanapolicy.org/marijuana-law-advocacy-training-amarillo/.

The Lubbock event, on Sunday, January 10, will be held at 12:30 p.m., at the Holiday Inn Express & Suites South, 6506 I-27 South. Details of the event are available at http://texasmarijuanapolicy.org/marijuana-law-advocacy-training-lubbock/.

The events, hosted by Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, are the sixth and seventh in a series of events being held around the state as part of an effort to inject the marijuana policy debate into 2016 state legislative races.

“Marijuana prohibition has been a miserable failure, and we want to give concerned Texans the tools to help enact sensible marijuana policy reform,” said Heather Fazio, a spokesperson for Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy. “Our communities should not be using their limited law enforcement resources to criminalize adults for using a substance that is safer than alcohol.

Texas: Local Marijuana Reform Advocates To Gather Saturday For Advocacy Training

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Local marijuana policy reform advocates, including a former police officer and the head of the Texas Young Republicans, will gather Saturday for an advocacy training event at the Trini Mendenhall Community Center in Houston.

The event, hosted by Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, is the fifth in a series of events being held around the state as part of an effort to inject the marijuana policy debate into 2016 state legislative races. Regional events are also scheduled in Amarillo on January 9 and Lubbock on January 10.

The featured speaker at Saturday’s event will be David Clark, a former police officer from South Carolina and member of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP).

"If the goal of marijuana prohibition is to reduce the harms to society caused by drugs, then prohibition should be illegal, not marijuana," said Clark. "It should be illegal to waste so many law enforcement resources arresting and charging nonviolent adults for using marijuana. It should be illegal to divert the focus of our police away from violent and property crimes, which should always take priority."

Joining David Clark will be John Baucum, political director of Republicans Against Marijuana Prohibition and recently elected chairman of the Texas Young Republicans.

Details of the event are available at http://texasmarijuanapolicy.org/training-houston/.

Texas: Marijuana Possession Could Soon Get Tickets, Not Arrests, In Dallas

TexasMarijuanaFlag[AustinCountyNewsOnline]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Dallas Police Chief David Brown said he has mixed feelings about allowing his officers to write tickets instead of arresting people who are caught with small amounts of marijuana. But he said the approach is "just so damn practical."

Police officers and city council members discussed the move at Tuesday's public safety committee meeting of the Dallas City Council, reports Melissa Repko at The Dallas Morning News. The "cite and release" pilot program would mean citations for marijuana possession, rather than arrests.

The public safety committee voted to refer the idea to the entire City Council without a recommendation.

A Texas state law passed in 2007 allows cops to issue citations instead of making arrests for some minor offenses, including possession of small amounts of cannabis. The approach is intended to save time and money by keeping minor offenders out of jail and allowing cops to remain on the streets; it doesn't change the official penalty for the crime.

Using cite and release is a "no brainer" that would help save time and lower 911 call response times, said council member Philip Kingston. He said it would allow cops to focus on public safety priorities.

Kingston said he'd legalized marijuana if he could, comparing marijuana possession to jay-walking in terms of seriousness.

Texas: Local Marijuana Reform Advocates To Gather Saturday For Advocacy Training

Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy is mobilizing activists throughout Texas in an effort to inject marijuana policy debate into 2016 state legislative races

Local marijuana policy reform advocates -- including an active-duty Dallas police officer -- will gather Saturday for an advocacy training event at the Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce in Tyler.

The event, hosted by Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, is the fourth in a series of events being held around the state as part of an effort to inject the marijuana policy debate into 2016 state legislative races. Regional events are also scheduled for Houston on December 12, Amarillo on January 9, and Lubbock on January 10.

The featured speaker at Saturday’s event will be Nick Novello, an officer with the Dallas Police Department and member of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP). Members of the media are invited to listen to his presentation at 3:30 p.m. CT, and he will be available for interviews immediately after.

“I work toward marijuana legalization because, as an active police officer, I have an obligation to improve public safety and protect my community,” Officer Novello said. “Regulation and education will focus police resources on more important crimes and make the drug more difficult for children to get. By every measure, marijuana prohibition has failed. Safer communities are within reach.”

Texas: Veterans Gather At State Capitol To Launch 'Operation Trapped' Supporting Medical Marijuana

RxCannabis[TexansForResponsibleMarijuanaPolicy]

At Veterans Day event, Air Force, Army, and Navy veterans urge state officials to pass legislation allowing access to medical marijuana — a safer alternative to many prescription drugs — for PTSD, TBI, and other service-related conditions

Texas veterans and their supporters on Wednesday -- Veterans Day -- gathered in front of the Vietnam Veterans Monument at the Texas State Capitol to announce the launch of a campaign advocating for comprehensive medical marijuana legislation.

Operation Trapped, backed by Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, is a veteran-based campaign to build support for legislation allowing access to medical marijuana — a safer alternative to prescription drugs — for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), chronic pain, and other service-related conditions.

“Veterans have sacrificed greatly to serve and protect our nation,” said David Bass of Killeen, a U.S. Army veteran who served in Operation Desert Storm and Operation Iraqi Freedom II. “It’s time to serve and protect the many soldiers who have returned home with debilitating conditions that would benefit greatly from medical marijuana. The goal of this campaign is to give those veterans a voice and get Texas legislators to listen.”

At the event, the campaign displayed several empty prescription pill bottles it has collected from supportive Texas veterans to represent those who are suffering from serious medical conditions that could be relieved by medical marijuana.

Texas: Veterans To Gather At Capitol On Veterans Day To Demand Medical Marijuana

TrappedByMalachiMuncy[Facebook]

Texas Veterans to Gather at State Capitol on Veterans Day to Launch ‘Operation Trapped;’ Group Wants Legal Access to Medical Marijuana — a Safer Alternative to Many Prescription Drugs — for PTSD, TBI, and Other Service-related Conditions

News Conference Wednesday at 1 p.m. CT in front of the Texas Capitol Vietnam Veterans Monument

Veterans are beginning a collection of supportive veterans’ prescription pill bottles to highlight the need for legal access to medical marijuana

Texas veterans and their supporters will gather in front of the Vietnam Veterans Monument at the Texas State Capitol at 1 p.m. CT on Wednesday, November 11, Veterans Day, to announce the launch of Operation Trapped. The monument is located on the northeast side of the Capitol grounds near the corner of 14th Street and Brazos Street.

Operation Trapped, backed by Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, is a veteran-based campaign intended to build support for legislation allowing access to medical marijuana — a safer alternative to prescription drugs — for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), chronic pain, and other service-related conditions.

Texas: Former Corrections Officer To Join Marijuana Policy Reformers For Advocacy Training Event

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Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy is mobilizing activists throughout Texas in an effort to inject marijuana policy debate into 2016 state legislative races

Local marijuana policy reform activists, including a former Texas corrections officer, will gather Saturday for an advocacy training event at the Janet F. Harte Library in Corpus Christi.

The event, hosted by Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, is the third in a series of events being held around the state as part of an effort to inject the marijuana policy debate into 2016 state legislative races. Regional events are also scheduled for East Texas on December 5 and Houston on December 12. Last month, activists held trainings in Dallas and San Antonio.

The featured speaker at Saturday’s event will be Michael Gilbert, Ph.D., a University of Texas San Antonio criminal justice professor and former Texas corrections officer. He will join representatives of Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy for media availability at 12:00 p.m. CT, and members of the media are invited to listen to his presentation at 1:15 p.m. CT.

“During nearly 16 years working as a corrections professional with military and state corrections, it became clear to me that marijuana prohibition is causing more harm than good," Dr. Gilbert said. "These laws have been counterproductive and fail to meet any of their policy objectives.

Texas: Marijuana Activists To Gather In Dallas Saturday For Advocacy Training Event

TexansForResponsibleMarijuanaPolicy(logo)

Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy is mobilizing activists throughout Texas in an effort to inject marijuana policy debate into 2016 state legislative races

Local marijuana policy reform activists, including a former Dallas police official, will gather Saturday, Oct. 31, for an advocacy training event at the J. Erik Jonsson Central Library in Dallas.

The event, hosted by Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, is the second in a series of events being held around the state as part of an effort to inject the marijuana policy debate into 2016 state legislative races. Regional events are also scheduled for Corpus Christi on November 7, East Texas on December 5, and Houston on December 12. The first event was held earlier this month in San Antonio.

The featured speaker at Saturday’s event will be Joe Morris, a retired senior police corporal who enforced marijuana laws in uniform and undercover during his tenure at the Dallas Police Department. He will join representatives of Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy for media availability at 9:30 a.m. CT, and members of the media are invited to listen to his presentation at 10:15 a.m. CT.

“Marijuana prohibition has been a public policy failure and a public safety nightmare,” said Morris, who participated in hundreds of marijuana-related undercover stings during his career, oftentimes involving buying marijuana from or selling it to high school students.

Texas: Marijuana Activists Mobilizing Statewide; 3 Out Of 4 Voters Support Reform

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Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy to Mobilize Activists Statewide in Effort to Inject Marijuana Policy Debate Into 2016 State Legislative Races; New Texas Lyceum Poll Finds Three Out of Four Voters Support Reform

First of several regional advocacy training events will be held Saturday in San Antonio; UTSA criminal justice professor and former corrections officer Michel Gilbert will be a guest speaker

Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy will hold an advocacy training event Saturday, October 3, in San Antonio that will mark the beginning of a statewide effort to inject the marijuana policy debate into 2016 state legislative races. Regional events are also scheduled for Dallas on October 31, Corpus Christi on November 7, East Texas on December 5, and Houston on December 12.

“Comprehensive marijuana reform saw tremendous progress this legislative session largely because families and regular Texans shared their stories with lawmakers,” said State Sen. José Menéndez (D-San Antonio). “The movement to change our antiquated and dangerous prohibition laws are gaining traction. However, that momentum will be lost unless citizens stay engaged with their lawmakers during the interim and campaign season.

“That's why these advocacy training events are so important because citizens will be the catalyst for change,” Sen. Menéndez said. “I'm excited the inaugural training session is taking place in San Antonio. Poll after poll shows Texans are ready for comprehensive marijuana reform.”

Texas: Police Search Woman's Vagina For Marijuana - In Parking Lot

CharnesiaCorleyAccustedDeputyOfIllegalSearch[ABC13]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

A Texas woman says sheriff's deputies violated constitutional protections by conducting a body cavity search in the parking lot of a gas station during a routine traffic stop last June.

Charnesia Corley, 21, was driving in Harris County about 10:30 p.m. on June 21 when a male deputy pulled her over, allegedly for running a stop sign, reports Dylan Baddour at the Houston Chronicle. He claimed he smelled marijuana, handcuffed Corley, put her in the back of his cruiser and searched her vehicle for almost an hour.

The officer found no marijuana, said Corley's attorney, Sam Cammack.

Returning to his cruiser, the deputy again claimed he smelled marijuana, and called in a female deputy to conduct a body cavity search. When the female deputy arrived, she ordered Corley, who is African American, to pull her pants down, but Corley protested, saying she was handcuffed and had no panties on.

The deputy ordered Corley to bend over, then pulled down her pants and began to insert her fingers into Corley's vagina. "She tells me to pull my pants down," Corley said. "I said, 'Ma'am, I don't have any underwear on. She says, 'Well, that doesn't matter. Pull your pants down," Corley said.

"I bend over and she proceeds to try to force her hand inside of me. I tell her, 'Ma'am, No. You cannot do this,'" Corley said.

U.S.: Neuroscientist Says THC Level In Sandra Bland's System Was Negligible

DrCarlHart(ColumbiaUniversity)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The amount of THC in Sandra Bland's system was negligible, and equal to placebo, according to neuroscientist Dr. Carl Hart, who has spent nearly 20 years researching the neurophysiological, psychological and behavioral effects of marijuana.

"Of course, the scientific evidence almost never supports these fantastic distractions," Dr. Hart said. "Yet, the 'drug-crazed black person' myth continues to be revitalized decade after decade by racists masquerading as public servants."

"I find this line of reasoning insulting and offensive," Dr. Hart said. "It seeks to misuse the science of behavioral pharmacology to excuse reprehensible acts perpetrated by the state or state proxies."

"As part of my research, I have given thousands of doses of marijuana to people and carefully studied their immediate and delayed responses," Dr. Hart said. "And I have never observed a marijuana-induced violent and self-destructive attack or anything remotely similar to the summer reefer madness put forth by desperate public officials."

"Bland's levels were well below the THC levels that I have found necessary to induce intoxication," Dr. Hart said.

"It was Encinia who behaved irrationally and escalated the situation, not Bland," Dr. Hart said. "There is no indication that she was under the influence of marijuana or that it caused her to behave foolishly.

U.S.: Study Says Marijuana Use Down, Disapproval Up Among Young Teens

DiplomaJoint[Inquisitr]

It seems all those drug policy reformers were right when they told us the way to reduce teen marijuana use was public education rather than a law enforcement response.

The proportion of adolescents reporting marijuana use has decreased since 2002, and more younger adolescents report strong disapproval of marijuana use initiation, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin School of Social Work.

The findings could provide guidance to policymakers and educators who are focused on marijuana use, according to the scientists involved.

The study, led by social work professor Christopher Salas-Wright and published in The American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse, examined the perceptions and use of marijuana among youths in the United States between 2002 and 2013.

Changes were particularly marked among younger adolescents (ages 12-14), as study findings point to a 25 percent decline — from 6 percent in 2002 to 4.5 percent in 2013 — in the relative proportion of youths reporting marijuana use in the previous 12 months, and an increase from 74 percent to 79 percent reporting strong disapproval of marijuana use initiation.

“Our results may suggest that recent changes in public policy, including the decriminalization, medicalization and legalization of marijuana in cities and states across the country, have not resulted in more use or greater approval of marijuana use among younger adolescents,” Salas-Wright said.

Texas: Dallas Woman Raises Awareness About 'Cite And Release' Marijuana Law

YvetteGbalazehCiteAndRelease[Fox4News.com]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Texas has a law allowing law enforcement to write a ticket rather than taking someone to jail for less than two ounces of marijuana, and it's been on the books since 2007 -- but most cops statewide aren't using it.

That's where Yvette Gbalazeh, a graduate of the University of Houston, comes in. Gbalazeh spends her days educating people about the law, reports Shaun Rabb at Fox 4 News.

"Over the past week, I've spoken to 13 out of the 26 chiefs of police for all the cities in [Dallas] County," Gbalazeh said.

Balch Springs, Texas police are now trying the cite and release option.

“You make an arrest on it, then you have to process the marijuana, you have to put it into evidence or into the property room,” said Lt. Mark Maret with the Balch Springs Police Department. “Plus you go back and you have to file the paperwork, your arrest report for our police department, but then you also have to file all the paperwork to file charges though Dallas County.”

The cite and release bill was written by former state Rep. Jerry Madden of Plano back in 2007. "We passed it as a voluntary law," Madden said.

"We knew it would be voluntary and we knew it would take time and we hope it would just gain strength," Madden said. But Texas law enforcement seemed to prefer to keep arresting people for pot rather than just writing them a ticket for it.

Texas: Governor To Sign Limited Medical Marijuana Bill Into Law

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SB 339 is intended to allow access to low-THC marijuana extracts for qualifying seizure patients; advocates hope to fix the flawed measure in next legislative session

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott is scheduled to sign a bill into law Monday that recognizes the medical benefits of marijuana. SB 339, sponsored by Sen. Kevin Eltife (R-Tyler), is intended to allow patients with intractable seizure conditions to access marijuana extracts containing high levels of cannabidiol (CBD) and only trace levels of THC.

SB 339 requires doctors to “prescribe” low-THC marijuana extracts to patients, which exposes doctors to federal criminal sanctions. By contrast, doctors “recommend” medical marijuana or “certify” or "authorize" patients to use medical marijuana in the 23 states with comprehensive medical marijuana laws and the District of Columbia.

Unlike “prescriptions,” recommendations, certifications and authorizations are federally legal and protected under the First Amendment.

The bill also only allows for extracts with very little THC, and some seizure patients say a greater ratio of THC to CBD is necessary for it to be effective in reducing the frequency and severity of seizures. The bill also fails to allow access to any medical marijuana products for people suffering from other debilitating conditions, such as PTSD, cancer, and multiple sclerosis, for which medical marijuana has been found to have significant medical benefits.

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