THCF

Wisconsin: Patients Receive Oregon Medical Marijuana Authorizations at Harvest Fest

Wisconsin-DennisBrennan(GreatMidwestMarijuanaHarvestFest2014)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Forty-eight Wisconsin medical marijuana patients this year got their Oregon medicinal cannabis authorizations at the annual Great Midwest Marijuana Harvest Fest. "But wait," you may be thinking. "They live in Wisconsin, not Oregon." That's entirely true -- but according to those in the know, having an out-of-state medical marijuana authorization gives these patients some legal cover should the police come calling.

The authorizations were issued by THCF Medical Clinics at the Harvest Fest as part of something called The Ben Masel Project. Masel was a famous Yippie activist based in Madison who started the Great Midwest Marijuana Harvest Fest; he died suddenly from cancer three and a half years ago.

"The Oregon permit has saved several people in Wisconsin from arrest," THCF founder Paul Stanford told Hemp News. The fact that Oregon issues permits to out-of-state patients has been helpful to those in Wisconsin and other non-MMJ states, according to Stanford.

"This weekend, we helped 48 patients in Wisconsin get Oregon medical marijuana permits, bringing in almost $10,000 in state fees for the Oregon Health Authority," Stanford told us. "Really, the Wisconsin Legislature should act to help its sick and dying patients, and keep those funds in Wisconsin."

Stanford said speaking at the Great Midwest Marijuana Harvest Fest, the 44th annual event, "is an old tradition" for him. "I first spoke here in Madison 25 years ago, in 1989, and I came back and spoke again in 1990 and many years since," he told us.

Oregon: Portland Hempstalk Festival Moves to Tom McCall Waterfront Park This Weekend

Hempstalk2014

City of Portland Issues Permit

It's a go for the 10th annual Portland Hempstalk Festival; after months of delay, city officials have finally issued a permit for this weekend's event.

"Event coordinators for the Portland Hempstalk annual festival are proud to announce the City of Portland has issued our permit for this weekend's event (September 27-28) at Tom McCall Waterfront Park in Portland, Oregon," a press release from the Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH) reads.

Hempstalk advocates decriminalization of cannabis for medicinal, industrial, and recreational use. Founded in 2005 by The Hemp and Cannabis Foundation, the festival features live music, guest speakers, food and goods vendors and information booths.

This public event has always been free to attend, with a suggested donation of $10 per person.

Featuring three stages, the Jack Herer Main Stage, the newly added Green Goddess Stage, and the Elec-Chronic DJ Stage, the bands, music and informational guest speakers are sure to inspire and inform attendees.

Already confirmed on the musical bill for 2014 are Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, John Trudell and Bad Dog, Herbivores, Los Marijuanos, Poet and Cannabis Advocate John Sinclair, The Sindicate, J Mack and Big Dub, Bad Habitat and more. To view the complete line-up, check out http://hempstalk.org/festival/lineup

Oregon: House Passes Bill To License Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

MarijuanaLeaves

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The Oregon House on Monday passed a bill to license and regulate the nearly 200 medical marijuana dispensaries operating in the state.

House Bill 3460 requires the Oregon Health Authority to set up a licensing system under the state's Medical Marijuana Act.

"I urge the Oregon Senate to pass HB 3460 so patients can have safe, over-the-counter, regulated access to medical marijuana in a open, legal retail environment, said Paul Stanford, president of The Hemp and Cannabis Foundation (THCF) and director of the Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH), which owns Hemp News.

"We shouldn't be pushing people with serious illnesses into the black market for relief," Stanford said. "HB 3460, when implemented, will protect patients, growers and retail establishments from wrongful arrest and potential incarceration."

“HB 3460 is a moderate bill that recognizes that some 200 dispensaries are operating all over Oregon today, patients are visiting them regularly and it is time to bring these facilities under the medical marijuana program,” said Geoff Sugerman, director of Oregonians for Medical Rights, the group sponsoring the legislation. "The regulations will provide a new level of safety and access to patients while giving dispensaries and local communities clear direction on how these should be operated."

Oregon: Two Marijuana Initiatives Filed For State Ballot

PaulStanfordTHCF

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Hemp News and The Hemp and Cannabis Foundation (THCF) owner Paul Stanford has filed two new initiatives to legalize marijuana in Oregon.

One of the measures is similar to an 2012 initiative that fell short by just six points at the polls, but with a couple of major changes, reports Jeff Mapes at The Oregonian. The commission would no longer be chosen by cannabis growers, retailers and others in the marijuana community, but instead would be appointed by the governor, according to Stanford.

"In retrospect, [the commission proposal] was probably the most damaging thing in the campaign," Stanford said of Measure 80. The Portland-based president of the Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH) said that a governor-appointed commission, in the new proposal, would poll better with voters.

The other major change from Measure 80, which would have allowed adults to possess unlimited quantities of marijuana, is that the new proposal would impose limits of 24 plants and 24 ounces of dried marijuana.

Stanford's second proposed initiative would constitutionally allow those 21 and older to possess and grow cannabis. It would allow the state to "reasonably define, limit and regulate" marijuana.

Stanford said he is working with a broad coalition of cannabis activists and will go ahead with whichever of the two legalization measures they decide has the best chance of passage.

Oregon: Legislature Approves Medical Marijuana For PTSD

(Illustration: Where's Weed?)House Passes SB 281 on 36-23 Vote; Senate Approved Bill Last Month

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The Oregon House on Thursday passed SB 281, which adds post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to the list of medical conditions which qualify patients for the protections of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act. The bill now heads to Governor John Kitzhaber's desk.

The Oregon Senate had already approved the bill last month on a 19-11 vote.

If the bill is signed by the Governor, Oregon will join New Mexico, Connecticut and Delaware as the fourth state to specifically recognize PTSD as an eligible condition for medical marijuana. The bill had bipartisan support in both the Senate and the House.

Numerous studies have found that marijuana can be an effective treatment for severe PTSD symptoms. At least 20 percent of soldiers returning home from Iraq and Afghanistan suffer from PTSD, according to a 2008 RAND Corporation study, reports the Marijuana Policy Project.

Patients with PTSD, who often have trouble tolerating the side effects of pharmaceuticals prescribed for PTSD indications such as sleeplessness, anxiety, and social isolation, find that medical marijuana is a helpful alternative. There is also evidence that use of medical marijuana reduces the risk of accidentally overdosing from traditional prescription drug cocktails.

Oregon: Best Legislative Session Ever For Marijuana Policy Reform?

(Illustration: Where's Weed?)By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Marijuana policy reform is advancing on multiple fronts in Oregon, with both medicinal cannabis and general legalization measures gaining traction in an increasingly friendly Legislature.

"We are seeing the best legislative session for drug policy reform -- certainly since the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act passed in 1998, and perhaps ever -- this go-round," Paul Stanford, president of The Hemp and Cannabis Foundation (THCF) and the Campaign for the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH), which owns Hemp News.

In the last week, the Oregon Senate:

• Passed SB 281 on a 19-11 vote. This bill adds post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to the list of debilitating medical conditions which qualify patients for the protections of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Act (OMMA).

• Passed SB 40, 24-6. This bill realigns the felony level designations of Manufacturing and Possession to be consistent with the rescheduling in Oregon of marijuana from Schedule I to Schedule II; and creates misdemeanor marijuana possession (more than one ounce, less than four ounces) and misdemeanor hashish possession (less than 1/4 ounce).

California: Activist Swerdlow At Center of State Supreme Court Marijuana Case

(Photo: Rachel Luna, Daily Bulletin)By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

The City of Riverside, California has for years attempted to close the Inland Empire Patients Health and Wellness Center, a medical marijuana collective at the heart of a state Supreme Court case in San Francisco that could determine the future of medicinal cannabis in the state -- specifically if cities have the authority to ban dispensaries.

Riverside officials claim the city is trying to close the center because it prohibits such facilities in its zoning ordinance, reports Wes Woods at the Daily Bulletin.

Oral arguments in the state Supreme Court case were given on February 5; the court's decision -- due within 90 days of the hearing -- will have a big impact on similar cases in California.

After voters passed Proposition 215, the Compassionate Use Act of 1996, patients were given the right to cultivate and possess marijuana for personal medicinal use. Prop 215 was the first medical marijuana law in the United States. But federal law bans marijuana for any purpose, classifying it as a Schedule I controlled substance with no accepted medical uses.

Riverside officials claim that Prop 215 doesn't prohibit them from banning dispensaries through zoning, but Lanny Swerdlow -- who founded the Inland Empire Patients Health and Wellness Center -- said that cities have no such right.

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