portland police

Oregon: Portland Approves 2015 Hempstalk Festival

PaulStanfordAndPortlandMayorCharlieHales[TheOregonian]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Hempstalk 2015 is on! The Portland City Council on Thursday voted to grant Hempstalk a permit for its 2015 festival at Tom McCall Waterfront Park downtown. "We will have our Hempstalk festival," said organizer Paul Stanford.

The Council, on a 3-1 vote, overturned the Portland Parks Bureau's earlier decision to deny the permit, reports Andrew Theen at The Orergonian. The Police Bureau also opposed Hempstalk, a free 11-year-old festival which celebrates and advocates the legalization of marijuana and industrial hemp.

The lone "no" vote came from Commissioner Amanda Fritz, who oversees the Parks Bureau.

The decision means Hempstalk 2015 could occur around the same time as the first legal sales of recreational marijuana in Oregon, on October 1. "If I had my preference, it would be the first weekend of October," said Hempstalk organizer Stanford of the Campaign of the Restoration and Regulation of Hemp (CRRH).

Parks officials, meanwhile, claimed the event is set for September 26 and 27. Stanford said he had "no idea" where they got that date.

"It sounds like this event was imperfect," said Portland Mayor Charlie Hales on Thursday. "It sounds like there were some people smoking marijuana there." But Mayor Hales added that most large events in Portland are imperfect.

Oregon: Portland Police Release Guide To Legal Marijuana

PortlandPoliceMarijuanaGuide[KATU]

Guide Compares An Ounce Of Weed To A Voodoo Doughnut

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

With Oregon set to legalize marijuana on July 1, the Portland Police Bureau has released a guide for cannabis consumers which explains just how much weed is legal under the new law.

The guide explains how much weed you can carry "in the most Portland was possible," reports KATU, by comparing an ounce to the size of a Voodoo doughnut. (Voodoo Doughnuts, recently experienced for the first time by this reporter, is a Portland institution, popular among both cannabis users and the public at large for its large, tasty creations.)

While Oregon's law allows just an ounce to possess while you're out and about, you can have up to 8 ounces at home. Anything more is still illegal.

Driving under the influence of marijuana can get you a ticket, as can using it in a public place. But if you see someone smoking pot in public, police urge you NOT to call 911, unless there is an immediate public safety risk; they truly don't want to be bothered. Even the COPS know that it's a dumb waste of their time and your money to arrest folks for smoking weed.

The same goes for any scenario where you smell marijuana from your neighbor's home or yard; if it's bothering you, Portland police said you should discuss it directly with your neighbor and not call 911.

Transporting marijuana from Oregon to Washington -- as tempting as that might be, sine it's going to be a lot cheaper in Oregon -- would be a violation of federal drug laws.

Oregon: Portland Police Say Bringing Marijuana From Washington Isn't An Issue

NewVansterdamVancouverWA(logo)

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Portland police on Wednesday said that Oregonians who travel to Washington state to buy marijuana to bring it back are "not an issue" as long as they stay within legal limits.

Beginning on July 1, Oregonians 21 and older are allowed to possess up to one ounce of marijuana away from home, and up to eight ounces at home, under the recreational cannabis legalization law approved by voters last November.

Oregonians going to Washington to shop for marijuana are nothing new, reports Noelle Crombie at The Oregonian. Sales data released by the Washington Liquor Control Board for May showed that one recreational 502 shop in Vancouver -- just across the state line -- sold more marijuana than any other shop in the state, thanks in part to Oregonians, who account for about half of sales.

But Portland police said they don't see this as a problem.

"We are not doing interdiction on people who are going there to buy their weed and bringing it back," Sgt. Pete Simpson said. "Our drugs and vice division has not and does not focus on low level drug transfers of any kind. They are working large scale operations, which is not what we are talking about."

Oregon: Court Rules Portland Police Pulling U.S. Mail For Dog Sniff Test Is Unlawful

MaxBarnthouse[TheOregonian]

By Steve Elliott
Hemp News

Portland police and a U.S. postal inspector had no legal authority to intercept a package headed to a Portland home just because they suspected it contained contraband and a police dog later alerted to it, the Oregon Court of Appeals ruled on Wednesday.

The ruling will likely put an end to the long-standing practice of having a postal inspector and two cops pull aside and examine express mail packages at Portland International Airport's postal cargo center without obtaining search warrants, reports Aimee Green at The Oregonian.

It's the first time an Oregon appeals court has ruled on this issue, according to Stephen Houze, the Portland defense attorney representing defendant Max Barnthouse. Barnthouse, then 26, was arrested in April 2012 after cops pulled a package from mail that had been headed to his home.

The cops claimed because the package was addressed to a pseudonym, had a handwritten rather than a typed address, had an incorrect zip code, and the postage was paid with cash or debit card rather than from an established business account, that was enough for them to remove Barnthouse's package from the mail about 6 a.m. at set it aside for narcotics detection dog Nikko to sniff. The dog signaled on the package.

Police and the postal inspector pull 30 or 40 packages a day for the sniff test, according to the appeals court summary. The dog is right about nine out of 10 times, one officer testified.

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